ZombieFit

Parkour WOD

Parkour WOD: 06/30/13

by on Jun.30, 2013, under Parkour WOD

Parkour WOD

What are we training?: Safety Rolls!

The safety roll or “parkour” roll is another essential skill that must be mastered prior to performance of any intermediate or advanced parkour movement. You should practice this rolls so that the movement is natural and instinctive. You will never know when you will need to roll out of a failed vault or precision and often you will not have time to think about rolling. This is the most important parkour movement you will learn.

How can you practice it?:

You can watch this video for a simple progression into teaching yourself to roll. Some keys to remember:

Practice on a soft surface when first starting to learn the movement.

If at ANY time the movement hurts anywhere you are doing it wrong.

Do not rush this movement, take your time and learn the skill. The parkour roll can and will (if you train long enough) save you from severe injury.

Why is this important?

Again, safety. When performing movements at full-speed or from any height you may find yourself heading towards the ground quickly and without having enough time or ability to absorb your landing appropriately. At that point you will do a roll and essentially take your momentum forward instead of into the ground, thereby distributing the force of the landing/bail across your entire body; instead of just on your legs.

We also can use the same physics to demonstrate the utility of a parkour safety roll as we did in the last Parkour WOD. By performing the roll you essentially increase the time of the landing while decreasing your change in velocity, thereby reducing the total acceleration of the fall/bail. As with the parkour landings, this decrease in acceleration lessens the total force of the fall/landing and results in less stress on your body.

The WOD:

Warm Up:

3 rounds of 10 push ups, 10 sit ups and parkour squats

etudiant

Roll Progression in the above video. Practice the movement until you are able to roll without pain and smoothly from your feet. Once you have achieved this expertise perform an additional 50 rolls.

avancee

50 safety rolls from the ground level.

25 safety rolls from a slight fall (2-4 feet in height). Make sure you jump from your take-off point and get some extra height. You will do the exact same thing as in the last Parkour WOD except at your landing you will go into your parkour roll rather than absorbing the impact with your legs. Practice the progression and take your momentum parallel to the ground instead of perpendicular.

25 safety rolls from the end of a vault (kong, speed, dash).

traceur

Same as avancee, however you should be performing the first set of 25 rolls out of a drop of at least your shoulder height. DO NOT ATTEMPT THIS UNLESS YOU HAVE COMPLETE KNOWLEDGE OF THIS MOVEMENT.

The second set of 25 should also be at the end of a vault, however you should attempt the roll with another movement after it, e.g. kong-roll-speed.

Note: These WODs are NOT for time. Learn the movement to the best of your ability.

Conditioning:
étudiant:
On the minute, for 5 minutes, sprint 100m.

avancée:
On the minute, for 7 minutes, sprint 100m.

traceur
On the minute, for 10 minutes, sprint 100m.

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Parkour WOD: 06/25/13

by on Jun.25, 2013, under Parkour WOD

Parkor WOD

What are we training?: Quadrupedal Movement

Quadrupedal Movement (QM) is a functional movement that can be used to navigate over difficult terrain and/or thin and long obstacles. The purpose of QM is to maintain stability and balance in your movement. Bipedal movement, while efficient, is not necessarily the best method when navigating certain environments. For instance, if you had to walk along a thin ledge with a large drop on both sides, it would be better for you to have four points of contact (as well as a lower center of gravity) than two.

How can you practice it?:

Forward QM
Get down on your hands and knees, placing your hands directly underneath your chest as if you were going to start doing push ups. Keep your knees directly underneath your hips. If you have done yoga before, this is very similar to a table-top position. Then lift your knees off the ground. You should be fully supporting yourself on your hands and feet. The weight should be balanced. You should not be top or bottom heavy. Now that you are in the start position, you can begin your movement. Pick an arm that you are going to start with. You are going to move forward using that arm AND the opposite leg. You should move these appendages at the same time. KEY NOTE: When moving your leg, do not move your knee more than 3-5 inches past your hip. Keep your torso elongated and your head slightly up. Then move your other arm and opposite leg. Continue going forward.

If you find yourself moving the same-side arm and leg, reset the start position and begin from the top.

Backward QM
This is the EXACT same movement as the forward QM, except you are going backward. This is exponentially more difficult than forward QM, but you can make it easier by not extending your foot too far back behind you. Your knees should still only move about 3-5 inches past your hips.

Why is this important?

This is a functional movement that will improve your proprioception (your sense of your body position) and functional strength. It has real-world applications and is something that ZombieFit uses in its conditioning WODs.

The WOD:

Warm Up:

3 rounds of 10 push ups, 10 sit ups and parkour squats

etudiant
50M forward QM
50M backwards QM

avancee
100M forward QM
100M backward QM

traceur
150M forward QM
100M backward QM

Note: *Remember, this is NOT a conditioning WOD. Take your time and think about the movement. Master it and make it perfect. If it doesn’t feel right or if something hurts, you are likely doing it incorrectly.

Conditioning WOD:

For time, complete the following:

etudiant
3 rounds for time of:

25M forward or backwards QM
25 air squats
25 jumpings jacks

avancee
4 rounds for time of:

25M forward or backwards QM
25 air squats
25 push ups

traceur
5 rounds for time of:

25M forward or backwards QM
25 air squats
25 push ups

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Parkour WOD: 06/20/13

by on Jun.20, 2013, under Parkour WOD

Parkour WOD

What are we training?: Precision Jumps

A precision jump is basically a broad jump where you are forcing yourself to land in a “precise” location. This is one of the most basic parkour movements and one that you will use constantly. It is the beginning progression into cranes and cat-leaps, as well as a movement that can result in significant hypertrophy of your lower body. A precision is almost identical to the Parkour Landing, except you are picking one spot and attempting to land on it.

How can you practice it?:

Simply pick a spot somewhere and jump to it. You do not have to jump to or from an elevated position; there is no need to precision something over a significant drop. You can just pick a spot 5 to 6 feet in front of you and try to land on it. When I first started training parkour I would pick cracks in concrete blocks. This may sound simplistic, but it can be quite hard to come down on the exact spot without falling forward or backwards.

The key to precisioning is to take your jump UP. You’ll want make your body into as close to a parabolic arc as possible in order to land the precision. Remember what we said in the parkour landings about pulling up your knees in front of you? Well, when you do that it is forcing your body to go up and not forward. The harder and faster you jump in a horizontal direction (i.e. if you were trying to hit a precision at close to your max jumping distance) the more difficult it will be to stick the landing. So, take your body up and try to land on your precisioning point in more of a vertical position than horizontal. Your body and the force generated by the jump should be going into the ground, not forward.

At that point it is simply a parkour landing, which you should have practiced in a prior Parkour WOD. If you have not practiced a parkour landing before, read that page and perform that WOD before moving onto precisions.

Why is this important?

Progression. The precision is a basic parkour movement that will make you stronger is the basis for what I’ll call the PCC Progression. Say you want to get from point A to point B, with point A being a standing block and point B being a wall about 7 feet away. If your goal is to get to the top of the wall, the most efficient movement is a precision. Let’s say that you cannot precision that distance, or want to attempt it but do not want to fall and break your skull. The next most efficient way to get to point B is a “crane“. This movement, while requiring substantial leg strength, reduces the length of the total movement by virtue of leaving the back foot down to trap against the wall. Now, let’s say that you can’t crane or precision to point B, you can then do a cat-leap which allows you to reduce the distance of the jump even further by bringing your hands into the equation.

As you can see, the movements follow a simple progression, however they can also be used as fail safes. If you feel the need to bail out of a precision you can go into a crane, and if find the distance to great to precision or crane, you can bail into a cat-leap. This parkour stuff is pretty neat. rce of the fall/landing and results in less stress on your body.

The WOD:

Warm Up:

3 rounds of 10 push ups, 10 sit ups and parkour squats

All levels:

Precision Ladder

If you do not feel comfortable with the movement or want extra practice then perform this on flat and even ground. If you want to get more advanced with the movement then attempt to precision to a curb, box or other object. Remember, when precisioning anywhere ALWAYS make sure your destination is stable and safe. Don’t jump on something that can’t hold your weight.

Note: These WODs are NOT for time. Learn the movement to the best of your ability. The precision does not count if you did not stick your landing!

Conditioning:

As quickly as possible (while still sticking your landing!), perform the following:

etudiant
5 rounds of:

50m sprint
5 push ups
5 precision jumps

avancee
5 rounds of:

100m sprint
10 push ups
10 precision jumps

traceur
5 rounds of:

100m sprint
25 push ups
15 precision jumps

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Parkour WOD: 10/02/12 (safety rolls)

by on Oct.02, 2012, under Parkour WOD

Parkour WOD 14

What are we training?: Safety Rolls!

The safety roll or “parkour” roll is another essential skill that must be mastered prior to performance of any intermediate or advanced parkour movement. You should practice this rolls so that the movement is natural and instinctive. You will never know when you will need to roll out of a failed vault or precision and often you will not have time to think about rolling. This is the most important parkour movement you will learn.

How can you practice it?:

You can watch this video for a simple progression into teaching yourself to roll. Some keys to remember:

Practice on a soft surface when first starting to learn the movement.

If at ANY time the movement hurts anywhere you are doing it wrong.

Do not rush this movement, take your time and learn the skill. The parkour roll can and will (if you train long enough) save you from severe injury.

Why is this important?

Again, safety. When performing movements at full-speed or from any height you may find yourself heading towards the ground quickly and without having enough time or ability to absorb your landing appropriately. At that point you will do a roll and essentially take your momentum forward instead of into the ground, thereby distributing the force of the landing/bail across your entire body; instead of just on your legs.

We also can use the same physics to demonstrate the utility of a parkour safety roll as we did in the last Parkour WOD. By performing the roll you essentially increase the time of the landing while decreasing your change in velocity, thereby reducing the total acceleration of the fall/bail. As with the parkour landings, this decrease in acceleration lessens the total force of the fall/landing and results in less stress on your body.

The WOD:

Warm Up:

3 rounds of 10 push ups, 10 sit ups and parkour squats

etudiant

Roll Progression in the above video. Practice the movement until you are able to roll without pain and smoothly from your feet. Once you have achieved this expertise perform an additional 50 rolls.

avancee

50 safety rolls from the ground level.

25 safety rolls from a slight fall (2-4 feet in height). Make sure you jump from your take-off point and get some extra height. You will do the exact same thing as in the last Parkour WOD except at your landing you will go into your parkour roll rather than absorbing the impact with your legs. Practice the progression and take your momentum parallel to the ground instead of perpendicular.

25 safety rolls from the end of a vault (kong, speed, dash).

traceur

Same as avancee, however you should be performing the first set of 25 rolls out of a drop of at least your shoulder height. DO NOT ATTEMPT THIS UNLESS YOU HAVE COMPLETE KNOWLEDGE OF THIS MOVEMENT.

The second set of 25 should also be at the end of a vault, however you should attempt the roll with another movement after it, e.g. kong-roll-speed.

Note: These WODs are NOT for time. Learn the movement to the best of your ability.

Conditioning:
étudiant:
On the minute, for 5 minutes, sprint 100m.

avancée:
On the minute, for 7 minutes, sprint 100m.

traceur
On the minute, for 10 minutes, sprint 100m.

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Parkour WOD: 09/27/12 (precision jumps)

by on Sep.27, 2012, under Parkour WOD

Parkour WOD 13

What are we training?: Precision Jumps

A precision jump is basically a broad jump where you are forcing yourself to land in a “precise” location. This is one of the most basic parkour movements and one that you will use constantly. It is the beginning progression into cranes and cat-leaps, as well as a movement that can result in significant hypertrophy of your lower body. A precision is almost identical to the Parkour Landing, except you are picking one spot and attempting to land on it.

How can you practice it?:

Simply pick a spot somewhere and jump to it. You do not have to jump to or from an elevated position; there is no need to precision something over a significant drop. You can just pick a spot 5 to 6 feet in front of you and try to land on it. When I first started training parkour I would pick cracks in concrete blocks. This may sound simplistic, but it can be quite hard to come down on the exact spot without falling forward or backwards.

The key to precisioning is to take your jump UP. You’ll want make your body into as close to a parabolic arc as possible in order to land the precision. Remember what we said in the parkour landings about pulling up your knees in front of you? Well, when you do that it is forcing your body to go up and not forward. The harder and faster you jump in a horizontal direction (i.e. if you were trying to hit a precision at close to your max jumping distance) the more difficult it will be to stick the landing. So, take your body up and try to land on your precisioning point in more of a vertical position than horizontal. Your body and the force generated by the jump should be going into the ground, not forward.

At that point it is simply a parkour landing, which you should have practiced in a prior Parkour WOD. If you have not practiced a parkour landing before, read that page and perform that WOD before moving onto precisions.

Why is this important?

Progression. The precision is a basic parkour movement that will make you stronger is the basis for what I’ll call the PCC Progression. Say you want to get from point A to point B, with point A being a standing block and point B being a wall about 7 feet away. If your goal is to get to the top of the wall, the most efficient movement is a precision. Let’s say that you cannot precision that distance, or want to attempt it but do not want to fall and break your skull. The next most efficient way to get to point B is a “crane“. This movement, while requiring substantial leg strength, reduces the length of the total movement by virtue of leaving the back foot down to trap against the wall. Now, let’s say that you can’t crane or precision to point B, you can then do a cat-leap which allows you to reduce the distance of the jump even further by bringing your hands into the equation.

As you can see, the movements follow a simple progression, however they can also be used as fail safes. If you feel the need to bail out of a precision you can go into a crane, and if find the distance to great to precision or crane, you can bail into a cat-leap. This parkour stuff is pretty neat. rce of the fall/landing and results in less stress on your body.

The WOD:

Warm Up:

3 rounds of 10 push ups, 10 sit ups and parkour squats

All levels:

Precision Ladder

If you do not feel comfortable with the movement or want extra practice then perform this on flat and even ground. If you want to get more advanced with the movement then attempt to precision to a curb, box or other object. Remember, when precisioning anywhere ALWAYS make sure your destination is stable and safe. Don’t jump on something that can’t hold your weight.

Note: These WODs are NOT for time. Learn the movement to the best of your ability. The precision does not count if you did not stick your landing!

Conditioning:

As quickly as possible (while still sticking your landing!), perform the following:

etudiant
5 rounds of:

50m sprint
5 push ups
5 precision jumps

avancee
5 rounds of:

100m sprint
10 push ups
10 precision jumps

traceur
5 rounds of:

100m sprint
25 push ups
15 precision jumps

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