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Parkour WOD

Parkour WOD: 08/07/12

by on Aug.06, 2012, under Parkour WOD

Parkour WOD 8

What are we training?: Safety Rolls!

The safety roll or “parkour” roll is another essential skill that must be mastered prior to performance of any intermediate or advanced parkour movement. You should practice this rolls so that the movement is natural and instinctive. You will never know when you will need to roll out of a failed vault or precision and often you will not have time to think about rolling. This is the most important parkour movement you will learn.

You may have noticed that we’ve done this movement a couple of times before. Even if you feel you have mastered the safety roll, you should still continue to practice it.

How can you practice it?:

You can watch this video for a simple progression into teaching yourself to roll. Some keys to remember:

Practice on a soft surface when first starting to learn the movement.

If at ANY time the movement hurts anywhere you are doing it wrong.

Do not rush this movement, take your time and learn the skill. The parkour roll can and will (if you train long enough) save you from severe injury.

Why is this important?

Again, safety. When performing movements at full-speed or from any height you may find yourself heading towards the ground quickly and without having enough time or ability to absorb your landing appropriately. At that point you will do a roll and essentially take your momentum forward instead of into the ground, thereby distributing the force of the landing/bail across your entire body; instead of just on your legs.

We also can use the same physics to demonstrate the utility of a parkour safety roll as we did in the last Parkour WOD. By performing the roll you essentially increase the time of the landing while decreasing your change in velocity, thereby reducing the total acceleration of the fall/bail. As with the parkour landings, this decrease in acceleration lessens the total force of the fall/landing and results in less stress on your body.

The WOD:

Warm Up:

3 rounds of 10 push ups, 10 sit ups and parkour squats

etudiant

Roll Progression in the above video. Practice the movement until you are able to roll without pain and smoothly from your feet. Once you have achieved this expertise perform an additional 50 rolls.

avancee

50 safety rolls from the ground level.

25 safety rolls from a slight fall (2-4 feet in height). Make sure you jump from your take-off point and get some extra height. You will do the exact same thing as in the last Parkour WOD except at your landing you will go into your parkour roll rather than absorbing the impact with your legs. Practice the progression and take your momentum parallel to the ground instead of perpendicular.

25 safety rolls from the end of a vault (kong, speed, dash, safety). If you do not yet know how to perform a vault, then perform 25 rolls from a running start. Do not sprint into the roll, simply get your speed up to a light jog before jumping forward and then rolling when you land.

traceur

Same as avancee, however you should be performing the first set of 25 rolls out of a drop of at least your shoulder height. DO NOT ATTEMPT THIS UNLESS YOU HAVE COMPLETE KNOWLEDGE OF THIS MOVEMENT.

The second set of 25 should also be at the end of a vault, however you should attempt the roll with another movement after it, e.g. kong-roll-speed.

Note: These WODs are NOT for time. Learn the movement to the best of your ability.

Conditioning:

All levels:

50 burpees for time.

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Parkour WOD: 08/01/12 (safety vaults)

by on Aug.01, 2012, under Parkour WOD

Parkour WOD 7

What are we training?: Safety Vaults

A safety vault is one of the easiest and safest vaults to learn and is essential for beginners and traceurs alike. The movement, like all vaults, is used to navigate over an obstacle. The “safety” part of the vault comes from the fact that your outside foot touches the top of the obstacle on your way over it. This allows for more control and stability when performing the movement. This is great training for the novice as it is a perfect segue-way into a speed vault (which is essentially a safety vault without touching your outside foot to the obstacle). The more advanced practitioner should still practice this movement as it is perfect for obstacles that are slippery and/or unstable.

How can you practice it?:

If you are brand new to vaulting, then you should attempt to practice this in a gym area or somewhere with padding. If you have to practice it for the first time outside, please be careful and make sure you have a soft landing/padding in case you fall. Be familiar with safety rolls! It is essential you have the ability to roll out of a bad vault.

Pick an object that you can comfortably jump on, either with a crane or standing broad jump. ALWAYS check the obstacle or object for stability and safety. Make sure you know what is on the other side!

You’ll want to stand one full pace in front of the obstacle. Start toward the obstacle with your dominant foot first. You’ll take one more step with your non-dominant foot and then take-off while throwing your dominant foot up and to the side. As seen in the video, you should have two points of contact on the obstacle as you go over. Attempt to place your hand as close to the middle of the obstacle as possible. Keep your shoulders square as you go over and don’t let your hand hang behind you. At the top of the obstacle your outside/dominant foot should be placed on the object and you should slide your back/non-dominant foot underneath. Watch your knees! It is better to jump over the object completely than hit the top. As you come out the other side you’ll extend your back/non-dominant foot to the ground and land with staggered legs while still moving forward. You will not be sticking your landing!

If you’re having problems getting to the top of the obstacle, pick a smaller one or practice your crane.

As you get more comfortable with the movement, you may increase your speed and the distance on your take-off.

Why is this important?

As stated above, this movement is essential to any practitioner. It can be used to scale most objects and is one of parkour’s safer and less risky movements. This should become an essential part of your parkour toolset.

The WOD:

Warm Up:

3 rounds of 10 push ups, 10 sit ups and parkour squats

etudiant

Find an obstacle that you can easily jump on using a crane or precision.

Perform 25 safety-vaults.

avancee

You should be familiar with the movement and be able to perform it efficiently and correctly.

Pick an obstacle that is close to your waist in height.

Perform 30 safety-vaults.

traceur

You should be VERY familiar with the movement and be able to perform it perfectly and at multiple different heights.

Find an object that is at your waist height or higher, but has a couple of feet in width.

Perform 30 safety vaults.

Note: *Remember, this is NOT a conditioning WOD. Take your time and think about the movement. Master it and make it perfect. If it doesn’t feel right or if something hurts, you are likely doing it incorrectly. You should flow over the top of the obstacle.

Conditioning WOD:

For time, complete the following:

etudiant
3 rounds of:

10 push ups
10 sit ups
10 air squats
10 jumping jacks

avancee
3 rounds of:

20 push ups
20 sit ups
20 air squats
20 jumping jacks
5 burpees

traceur
5 rounds of:

20 push ups
20 sit ups
20 air squats
20 jumping jacks
10 burpees

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Parkour WOD: 07/26/12 (cranes)

by on Jul.26, 2012, under Parkour WOD

Parkour WOD 7

What are we training?: Cranes

According to the Parkour Wiki (which is an amazing resource for beginning practictioners, a crane is:

The Crane is a technique for progressing onto high objects which which are taller than you are. Cranes also serve as an accurate way to land onto of an obstacle from a running jump, precision technique, or vault. The landing of a crane involves the practitioner landing with his or her leg on top of the object, with the toe of the other foot perpendicularly touching the side of that object. There are some variations to the crane, though rather than personal taste, each variation is used for a different speeds and environments.

How can you practice it?:

To start practicing the crane for the first time, find an obstacle that you can comfortably jump onto with both feet. Now is not the time to impress your friends with your 36-inch standing jump (that comes later). Jump to the top of the obstacle using both feet a couple of times to familiarize yourself with the height. Once you have done that, take a couple of steps back and prepare yourself for your first crane!

You’ll want to decide which foot you’ll be using to land on the top of the obstacle. In most cases you’ll use your dominant foot. If you’re not sure which foot is dominant, you can try with both feet to see which leg feels more comfortable. You’ll want to step about 2 to 3 feet away from the obstacle prior to starting the movement.

If you’re landing with your right foot, you’ll start the movement by taking two steps, leading with your right foot and followed by your left. Instead of taking a third step with your right foot, you’re going to throw your right knee up in front of you, while also taking off with your left foot. Throwing the knee up is what gives you height in the movement. Ideally, you should be far enough away from the obstacle at your take-off point to allow you to land comfortably on top of it. As with most parkour movements, you should take your momentum UP, not horizontal to the ground.

As you land, you’re going to keep that back leg semi-straight (there should be a slight bend at the knee) while using the ball of your back foot (left in this instance) to trap against the side of the obstacle. This is super important as by trapping your foot against the side of the obstacle it will keep your back knee and shin from hitting the obstacle.

Once you have landed in this position, you then use your forward leg (the leg on top of the obstacle) to lift yourself up. It is very similar to a single leg squat.

The crane is one of the most fluid movements in parkour. If you do it right, you should almost feel as if you are floating to the top of the obstacle. You should not be landing with a lot of force when performing a crane. As always, attempt to have “ninja feet” and land as quietly as possible.

When you start learning to crane, or if you are trying to crane something that is at a challenging height, there is nothing wrong with using your hands to help you get to the top of the obstacle.

Why is this important?

The crane is an important movement because it allows you to scale taller obstacles than you could with a precision jump. It can also be more efficient than a cat leap when running towards an obstacle that is taller than you waist but less tall than your shoulders. Further, it is a very fluid movement that will help you with your “flow” when performing multiple movements in succession.

The WOD:

Warm Up:

3 rounds of 10 push ups, 10 sit ups and parkour squats

etudiant

Pick an obstacle that you are able to jump to with both legs. Step back and practice the crane.

Perform 15 repetitions with each leg.

avancee

You should be familiar with the movement and be able to perform it efficiently and correctly.

Pick an obstacle that you can NOT jump to with both legs, but that you can safely crane.

Perform 20 repetitions with each leg.

traceur

You should be VERY familiar with the movement and be able to perform it perfectly and multiple different heights.

Perform 20 repetitions each leg. The height of the obstacle should be challenging.

Note: These WODs are NOT for time. Learn the movement to the best of your ability. The crane does not count if you did not stick your landing!

etudiant
In 10 minutes, complete as many rounds as possible of:

5 parkour squats
5 push ups
20 jumping jacks

avancee
In 15 minutes, complete as many rounds as possible of:

5 parkour squats
10 push ups
20 jumping jacks

traceur
In 20 minutes, complete as many rounds as possible of:

5 parkour squats
10 push ups
15 sit ups

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Parkour WOD: 07/21/12 (precision jumps)

by on Jul.21, 2012, under Parkour WOD

Parkour WOD 6

What are we training?: Precision Jumps

A precision jump is basically a broad jump where you are forcing yourself to land in a “precise” location. This is one of the most basic parkour movements and one that you will use constantly. It is the beginning progression into cranes and cat-leaps, as well as a movement that can result in significant hypertrophy of your lower body. A precision is almost identical to the Parkour Landing, except you are picking one spot and attempting to land on it.

How can you practice it?:

Simply pick a spot somewhere and jump to it. You do not have to jump to or from an elevated position; there is no need to precision something over a significant drop. You can just pick a spot 5 to 6 feet in front of you and try to land on it. When I first started training parkour I would pick cracks in concrete blocks. This may sound simplistic, but it can be quite hard to come down on the exact spot without falling forward or backwards.

The key to precisioning is to take your jump UP. You’ll want make your body into as close to a parabolic arc as possible in order to land the precision. Remember what we said in the parkour landings about pulling up your knees in front of you? Well, when you do that it is forcing your body to go up and not forward. The harder and faster you jump in a horizontal direction (i.e. if you were trying to hit a precision at close to your max jumping distance) the more difficult it will be to stick the landing. So, take your body up and try to land on your precisioning point in more of a vertical position than horizontal. Your body and the force generated by the jump should be going into the ground, not forward.

At that point it is simply a parkour landing, which you should have practiced in a prior Parkour WOD. If you have not practiced a parkour landing before, read that page and perform that WOD before moving onto precisions.

Why is this important?

Progression. The precision is a basic parkour movement that will make you stronger is the basis for what I’ll call the PCC Progression. Say you want to get from point A to point B, with point A being a standing block and point B being a wall about 7 feet away. If your goal is to get to the top of the wall, the most efficient movement is a precision. Let’s say that you cannot precision that distance, or want to attempt it but do not want to fall and break your skull. The next most efficient way to get to point B is a “crane“. This movement, while requiring substantial leg strength, reduces the length of the total movement by virtue of leaving the back foot down to trap against the wall. Now, let’s say that you can’t crane or precision to point B, you can then do a cat-leap which allows you to reduce the distance of the jump even further by bringing your hands into the equation.

As you can see, the movements follow a simple progression, however they can also be used as fail safes. If you feel the need to bail out of a precision you can go into a crane, and if find the distance to great to precision or crane, you can bail into a cat-leap. This parkour stuff is pretty neat. rce of the fall/landing and results in less stress on your body.

The WOD:

Warm Up:

3 rounds of 10 push ups, 10 sit ups and parkour squats

All levels:

Precision Ladder

If you do not feel comfortable with the movement or want extra practice then perform this on flat and even ground. If you want to get more advanced with the movement then attempt to precision to a curb, box or other object. Remember, when precisioning anywhere ALWAYS make sure your destination is stable and safe. Don’t jump on something that can’t hold your weight.

Note: These WODs are NOT for time. Learn the movement to the best of your ability. The precision does not count if you did not stick your landing!

Conditioning:

As quickly as possible (while still sticking your landing!), perform the following:

etudiant
3 rounds of:

10 precisions (Sticking your landings!)
10 push ups
10 sit ups

avancee

5 rounds of:

10 precisions (Sticking your landings!)
10 push ups
10 sit ups

traceur

5 rounds of:

10 precisions (Sticking your landings!)
10 push ups
10 sit ups
100m sprint

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Parkour WOD: 07/16/12 (landings)

by on Jul.16, 2012, under Parkour WOD

Parkour WOD 5

What are we training?: Landings.

This will not be a WOD to practice safety rolls, but one to practice landing at the end of a jump or precision. This should be how you land from most level movements, i.e. not from a height. You should ALWAYS roll when jumping or falling from any height greater than your shoulder.

How can you practice it?:

Landings are all about progression. You cannot start running and jumping off things without proper landing mechanics and without building up your muscle and tendon strength in your legs, ankles and feet. If you cannot perform 50 body-weight squats in a row without stopping, and without perfect form, you should not be landing from anything higher than 2 feet.

A parkour landing should begin at the jumping/precisioning point. Always make sure that you are landing in a safe area. Know what type of material you are jumping from and landing on (e.g. landing on slippery materials requires you to land perpendicularly to the ground so as not to slip forward or back). Also, you will always jump from your take-off point. Don’t just fall, even if you are at a height. I almost ruined my money-maker when I fell face-first off a wall when I just kind of fell and my toes clipped a recessed stone lip. Clear your feet from any obstacle at the beginning of the movement by getting some altitude.

As you leave your feet you should bring your knees up in front of you.

The reasoning for this is several-fold: 1) You will increase the height and distance of your jump by not leaving your feet behind you; 2) you will be able to pick your landing point and place your feet with more accuracy (if you jump with your feet trailing behind you, there is an increased chance of missing your precision point); and 3) you are in perfect position to absorb your landing with your legs.

When you are at the height of your jump or fall you need to extend your legs out underneath you.

You are not locking your knees, but keeping them slightly bent. You are almost reaching for the ground with your feet. You land on the balls of your feet and absorb the impact by going into a squat. You actively resist the fall by pushing against the ground as you come to a stop.

You do NOT land on your heels. You have a very large bone in your heel (the calcaneus) and it will hurt like a mother if you land directly on it. If you are practicing landing and it hurts you are doing it wrong. Stop what you’re doing and look at the movement again. Take this slow. You do not want to blow out your knees.

You do NOT keep your legs super loose and let your momentum take you all the way to the ground. Some people are super flexible and just collapse into themselves. Don’t do this. Use your quads and hamstrings to slow down the landing as you fall.

Why is this important?

Safety. Parkour is an incredible activity that can change your mental paradigm and how you look at the world. There are few things as satisfying as hitting a parkour movement for the first time. The other side of this coin is that parkour is dangerous. You can seriously hurt yourself doing the smallest movements if you do not pay attention to your surroundings or perform the movement properly. You need to be able to land properly and without hurting yourself.

Now, why is this landing safer and better for traceurs? Let’s do some physics.

The purpose of the parkour landing is to decrease the amount of force being applied to your body. Force is bad, mmmkay? Too much force puts unneeded stress on the body and its joints and bones which can result in injury and/or discomfort. Force can be described as:

F = m * a

m = mass and a = acceleration.

Further, acceleration can be described as:

a = (delta)Velocity/time

(delta)Velocity is the change in speed.

Hopefully our m is constant (if not you should probably go to the doctor, stop accelerating at near light speed), so the parkour landing is effectively reducing the force on our bodies by decreasing our acceleration.

Acceleration is decreased primarily via the extension of the legs. This gives the body a larger distance to travel prior to the ultimate stopping point (when movement is completed), and it also allows the traceur more time to slow his or her momentum going into the ground (by resisting the fall with your legs).

Another way to think about this is to imagine you are jumping from something and you land with your legs straight and/or locked. The impact is jarring because you come to a very quick stop, i.e. acceleration is very high as your speed changed very quickly over a short period of time.

By landing with your feet extended and then continuing the fall through that initial contact with the ground, you are extending the amount of time to complete the movement while also experiencing a decreased change in velocity. With ?Velocity being smaller and time being larger, acceleration has decreased, thereby resulting in less Force being applied to your body.

One tip that really helps with landing and reducing the force of the landing is to land with “ninja feet”. If you can land without making any sound then you are distributing the force adequately and safely.

The WOD:

Warm Up:

3 rounds of 10 push ups, 10 sit ups and 10 air squats

WOD:

etudiant

On the minute, for 10 minutes, perform an increasing number of broad jumps. In your first minute, perform 1 broad jump, in the second minute perform 2 broad jumps, etc. After you have performed the required number of broad jumps rest for the remaining time in the minute.

avancee

On the minute, for 15 minutes, perform an increasing number of broad jumps. In your first minute, perform 1 broad jump, in the second minute perform 2 broad jumps, etc. After you have performed the required number of broad jumps rest for the remaining time in the minute.

traceur

On the minute, for 20 minutes, perform an increasing number of broad jumps. In your first minute, perform 1 broad jump, in the second minute perform 2 broad jumps, etc. After you have performed the required number of broad jumps rest for the remaining time in the minute.

Cool Down:

All levels:

Read this ZombieFit Post on Ankle Conditioning

Perform 100 calf raises (50 each leg) x 2
Perform 100 toe raises (50 each leg) x 2

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